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#1 2020-09-14 02:12:26

TracieHenl
Member
From: Austria, Oppelhausen
Registered: 2020-09-13
Posts: 1

openSUSE uses the KDE Plasma native Software Updates tool

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Category: Qt.
AntiMicro |  Map Keyboard  and Mouse Controls to Gamepad on openSUSE.
Installed a game called  Pokemon Insurgence  on Lutris and there was no way to play the game with a gamepad.
Rather than try to fight things, set out for an application that would map the keyboard controls to the WiiU Pro  Controller  that has become my gamepad of choice.
I know I heard it was possible on a podcast some time ago and since I was probably doing  something  else and didn’t have a notebook handy to write down whatever it was, I began my search and found this AntiMicro as a solution.
A quick note, this is not a  comprehensive  and exhaustive analysis of all of its features.
I am covering just a portion of  the features .
Installation.
AntiMicro is in the official repositories for both Leap and  Tumbleweed .
To do the graphical click method, navigate here:    https://software.opensuse.org/package/antimicro    Alternatively, you can install it through the more exciting and personally gratifying method of the terminal:    sudo zypper install antimicro    For other distributions, search “antimicro” in your favorite software  management  system.
The  Problem Game .
The game I wanted to set up to use a  controller  is Pokémon Insurgence.
I observed my oldest child watching a play through on the YouTube and he spoke of interest in the game.
I found the game on the Lutris site with an easy installation process.
The game I wanted to set up to use a controller is Pokémon Insurgence.
I observed my oldest child watching a play through on the YouTube and he spoke of interest in the game.
I found the game on the Lutris site with an easy installation process.
https://lutris.net/games/pokemon-insurgence/             The issue is, there was no way to have this game use any control pad.
Only the keyboard.
I thought this annoying and didn’t play the game… until AntiMicro, that is.
Configuration.
The configuration of AntiMicro is incredibly straight forward.
So much so that this little write-up is almost unnecessary but I thought I would share my experience anyway.
When the application starts up and the system is absent any controllers, you will be presented with this screen.
What is pretty fantastic is that when you do activate, or plug in a controller, there isn’t any fiddling required.
The application immediately reacts and presents some straight forward options.
I turned on my Wii U Pro Controller, my controller of choice on those periodic cases that I decide to play a game.
The application immediately presented options.
At this point, you can push buttons on the controller and identify the buttons and in this process, I did discover that the A and B are swapped as well as the X and Y.
I looked at the Controller Mapping configuration and it looks like the physical locations are correct but the labels seem to be incorrect.
I would call this a small papercut issue but it is indeed an issue.
So beware of the labels and make sure that the button and the action are correct.
It is best to verify.
I took some screen shots of the input configuration portion of Pokémon Insurgence so I could map the keys out.
For the arrow key configuration, you can very easily map it all onto the DPad and the joystick of your choice.
I set both to control the movement of the character.
There is, kindly, a present drop-down to make this selection.
Each of the other keys can be assigned but do take note that you assign the correct key to the correct button and verify labels.
When you select the button, you can then select the corresponding key.
Not relevant for this game but just to make note, you can also map mouse movements which, I see as being valuable if you want to configure a controller to manage mouse movements without using the Steam to do so.
After completing and subsequently tweaking my button selection.
I was able to play a solid 10 minutes of Pokémon Insurgence on my Linux machine quite happily.
At this rate, I might get through it in the next 6 years or so.
What I Like.
The configuration is splendidly simple to set up.
It is very intuitive and does as you would expect.
I appreciate how easy it is to set up and get going with it.
The on screen information about what you are doing is very appreciated.
Rather than digging through help or readme files, the important information presents itself.
Finally, this is a Qt application so it integrates nicely into Plasma and my dark theme looks great.
It is as though the interface was tested against Breeze dark as there were not any unreadable bits to the application.
What I Don’t Like.
The one little papercut of the reversal of some buttons is unfortunate but not a deal breaker.
It’s only important if you actually read the buttons and not go by the action flash.
The mouse controls isn’t exactly as I was hoping.
The movement of the cursor didn’t exactly have the variable movements I was expecting but there are so many options, there is, perhaps one that would give a kind of gradient movement.
So, this is not really a knock on the application as the default is probably best for most users.
I would say, this is a knock on me for not being satisfied with what is likely a sane default.
AntiMicro is a fantastic application, especially if you play old DOS games or other emulated games that don’t have adequate controller support.
This also has the bonus feature of being able to easily map your controller to act as a mouse which may be a nice addition to a media set-top box for the living room.
I am glad I stumbled on this and I wish I could give attribution to where I recently heard about it but seeing as I don’t recall, I will miss the opportunity to link to that source.
If I do find this I will add an edit.
If you have some games that don’t play nice with controllers, try AntiMicro, it just may give that old game a fresh coat of paint.
https://software.opensuse.org/package/antimicrohttps://github.com/AntiMicro/antimicro.
, Hardware, , , Qt         2 Comments          10 August 2020          4 Minutes                    KDE Partition Manager on openSUSE.
I have become quite the fan of Gparted over the years of my Linux life and I started wondering if there were other partition management options out there.
Specifically one that is Qt based instead.
This is not a light on GTK based applications, I just find that they don’t tend to look as nice and clean as Qt apps.
In this off-hand search, I stumbled upon PartitionManger which is in official openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap Repositories.
I should note, they both Gparted and KDE Partition Manager use the same icon.
Installation.
Since this isn’t installed by default with the Plasma Desktop, arguably it should be, here is how you o about it.
I noticed on the openSUSE Software Site, its short description is that you can Easily manage disks, partitions and file systems on your KDE Desktop.
So I guess we will see if this holds true.
It is also described as being software that allows you to manage your disks, partitions and file systems that allows you to create, resize, delete, copy, backup and restore partitions with a large number of supported file systems.
These file systems include ext2 ext3, reiserfs, NTFS, FAT32 and more.
I am guessing you can also do Ext4, BTRFS and others.
It goes on to say that it makes use of external programs to get its job done, so you might have to install additional software (preferably packages from your distribution) to make use of all features and get full support for all file systems.
That’s good news as I am hoping it wouldn’t re-implement anything and just use existing tools.
To install in terminal:    sudo zypper install partitionmanager    or navigate here for the Direct Install Link    https://software.opensuse.org/package/partitionmanager    As expected, it installed very little, a total of 4 new packages:    kpmcore – KDE Partition Manager core library.
libkpmcore7 – KDE Partition Manager core library.
partitionmanager – Main Application package.
partitionmanager-lang – Language support.
Considering I have Gparted already installed, most of everything else is likely already there.
I have a great respect and love for Gparted at this point, I am hoping that I am not losing any features by using KDE Partition Manager.
First Run and Impressions.
Using the handy Plasma menu with the search feature, I started typing “Partition” and it popped up.
I launched it and was given the dialog for root user permissions.
I am on the fence if I like that very detailed command being being shown by default.
Instinctively, I say it is fantastic, but for a less experienced user, it could feel a bit overwhelming, perhaps.
After the root login requirement, I had this warning pop up which I thought was fantastic.
I have been using Gparted for quite some time and was having issues with an SD Card.
My laziness, I just ignored it and now I see what the problem was.
I needed the exfat utilities and now the world is right again.
Adding this was as easy as running this in the terminal:    sudo zypper install exfat-utils    This automatically selected fuse-exfat package to be installed as well.
Once all this was up.
I was greeted with a nice clean and familiar interface        What sets this apart from Gparted is that it shows you all the devices in a side pane instead of the drop-down.
I will say, I much prefer the side pane to the drop down.
It gives a better overview of what you are doing.
Gparted with the drop-down to select the device    I wanted to format a device and give it a label for my upcoming experimentation with Ventoy for keeping and testing Linux distribution ISOs.
So that is what I did.
Mainly, I just wanted the appropriate label.
I also took this as an opportunity to format that SD Card, also an easy success.
It works.
I can’t say it’s any better than Gparted as they both seem to work the same and have a similar appearance and workflow.
If you can use one, you can use the other.
The biggest difference is the devices side menu.
I do like that more than the Gparted drop down.
It provides a better snapshot of the status of the storage devices on your machine.
Outside of that.
KDE PartitionManager as well as Gparted are fantastic tools and this is mostly an appearance preference as I am sure they are using all the same backend of tools.
https://software.opensuse.org/package/partitionmanagerhttps://www.kde.org/applications/system/kdepartitionmanagerUSB or Removable Media Formatting in Linux on CubicleNate.com.
, Filesystems, , , , , Qt, ,          5 Comments          22 June 2020                             Kdenlive 19.12 on openSUSE | Review.
Making videos is not exactly my strong suit but it doesn’t have to be to enjoy it.
Lately, I have been dipping my toes into the world of video content creation.
Yes, most of it is  into making videos as I haven’t really had the need.
Recently, a need popped up for doing some video editing and I decided to give Kdenlive a try.
You have to start somewhere and since many of the independently created shows out there use it, it is part of the KDE project and there are a LOT of tutorials on YouTube.
Keep in mind, I have some very basic needs, simply, chaining clips together, title screen and a little background music.
These are extremely minimal requirements.
The nice thing about Kdenlive is, it is easy enough to get going with it, but brimming with features to keep you dinking around with it continually and even if you have come to learn every feature the Kdenlive Project will come along and bring you an update.
Installation.

Kdenlive is available in the main repositories for both Leap and Tumbleweed

To install the latest version for Leap, you will have to add the Experimental KDE:Applications repository.
19.12 is available in the official Tumbleweed repository.
To install it with the graphical Direct Installation navigate here.
https://software.opensuse.org/package/kdenlive    For Tumbleweed, in terminal    sudo zypper install kdenlive    And that is all it takes.
Impressions.
Right off the hitch, Kdenlive is a great looking application, it has a clean and pleasant interface that is incredibly functional.
I use a modified version of Breeze Dark, what I call openSUSE Breeze Dark.
The dark screen with the green tones make for a comfortably openSUSEy for extended hours of work.
I have been using Kdenlive for about a year or so and it has been great since day one.
I must make the caveat that I don’t do anything terribly complex in Kdenlive.
I mostly use fades and dissolves.
In fact that is my primary usage of it.
For one video, I rotated the screen 180° because I purposely recorded it upside down so that I wouldn’t crash into the camera with by big stupid nose.
In retrospect, this video of the hard drive caddy was probably a waste of time to do because it is so basic and elementary of a feature to highlight on the computer, but it was a good exercise in learning the some of the other various features in Kdenlive.
What was handy and very quick to do were my Christmas light musical sequence videos.
I recorded the video and added the music as a post edit.
Kdenlive made it easy to do.
I just lined up the flashes with the appropriate spot in the music.
Kdenlive really has made all these little things easy to do and they made it possible without having to spend loads of cash for a nonsense hobby that fills the little voids and white-spaces in my life.
Other Use.
Kdenlive is a very capable video editor but I have adapted it for another use.
I also use it for non-destructive audio editing as well.
Years ago, when I worked in radio, specifically in sales, I did some audio production work for commercials.
I used this application call “SAW Pro” that would allow me to import audio and manipulate it in a non-destructive manner.
Since I don’t have that application anymore I needed to find another way to do it and it hit me, Kdenlive can do these things.
I can’t exactly build the library of reusable clips in the exact same way, but I can come very close to it.
I have been using this for my under-performing podcast production.
What I Like.
Kdenlive is incredibly stable and reliable.
Crashing is incredibly rare.
I have spent many hours at a time editing and not once has Kdenlive crashed.
In all fairness, it’s been hours of editing because I am not very good at it.
I have used and rendered video on both my Dell Latitude E6440 and my “new” AMD FX-9590 system with out any glitching or issues.

I am impressed by the stability and smooth operation of Kdenlive on openSUSE Tumbleweed

The user interface of Kdenlive makes sense.
The shortcuts, the ease of defining the effects and transition as well as previewing the video makes for an easy and enjoyable video editing experience.
Even the scrolling across the timeline or through the tracks, all just makes intuitive sense.
The options for rendering videos or even just audio has a straight forward interface that makes it quite clear what is happening when you start that render.
Also, when you start the render, you can continue to use Kdenlive.
It does not lock you out of the application.
What I Don’t Like.
The text editor for title screens is a bit ropey.
The cursor indicator isn’t always visible so I often have to make special effort to get to the right location which includes some delete and retype from time to time.
The use of it is not as much fun as the rest of the application.
Not so much a fault of the application but doing video editing really needs more screen real-estate.
One 1080p screen is not enough.
Not the fault of the application but it is hard to see and read everything going on without excessive scrolling.
Kdenlive is a great application with a lot more features than I know how to even use.
I don’t do any complex video editing.
I don’t have good video equipment so I don’t have a real high level of motivation to create a lot of video content at this time.
You can only polish a turd so much and I am often not happy with the video I shoot.
I am happy, however, with what I can do with the video in Kdenlive.
It does make turning the lack-luster video into barely acceptable video content.
Editing with Kdenlive is easy to use and is enjoyable to turn the mess I start with into something more usable.
I would like to make more excuses to do more video content because the great user experience Kdenlive provides.
I have heard of people complain that Kdenlive isn’t stable, well, that is a bunch of hooey.

Kdenlive on openSUSE Tumbleweed works fantastically well without any crashing

I am very thankful for fantastic packaging and QA process from the openSUSE Project and I am very grateful for every programmer that has had a hand in every piece of this, from the Linux kernel to the Plasma desktop to the application itself.
Thank you for all your time and efforts.
https://kdenlive.org/Kdenlive 19.12 ReleaseopenSUSE Tumbleweed DownloadKdenlive Download from software.openSUSE.orgDell Latitude E6440AMD FX-9590 Workstation.
, Kdenlive, , , Qt,          2 Comments          8 January 20208 January 2020          5 Minutes                    Back In Time for Data Backups on openSUSE | Retrospective.
The lack of data security is something that has recently affected some municipal governments in a negative way.
Atlanta in 2018 was attacked with a ransomware and demanded $51,000 before they would unlock it.
Baltimore was hit a second time this past May [2019].
I am not a security expert but in my non-expert opinion, just keeping regular backups of your data would have prevented needing to spend a ransom to get your data back.
It would also help to run openSUSE Linux or one of the many other Linux options on the desktop to reduce the impact of a user induced damage due to wayward link-clicking.
If you are interested in keeping your personal data “safe,” offline backups are an absolute requirement.
Relying only on Google Drive, Dropbox, Nextcloud or whatever it may be is just not not adequate.
Those are a synchronizing solution and can be a part of your data-safekeeping strategy but not the entirety of it.
I have been using Back In Time as my backup strategy, in this time, I have only had to restore a backup once but that was an elected procedure.
Back In Time is great because it is a Qt based application so it looks good in KDE Plasma Installation.
For openSUSE users, getting the software is an easy task.
The point and click method can be done here: https://software.opensuse.org/package/backintime-qt The more fun and engaging method would be to open a terminal and run: sudo zypper install backintime-qt It is, after all, in the main openSUSE repository and not playing in the terminal when the opportunity presents itself is a missed opportunity.
How it has been going.
Since this is a retrospective on using Back In Time, you can find more about usage and other options backing up your system here. I am not going to claim that I was 100% disciplined performing weekly backups like I suggested.
The sad reality is, I got busy and sometimes it was every other week… I may have forgotten to do it entirely in April… but for the most part, I was pretty good about keeping my system backed up.
Since Back In Time is really quite easy to use it is as simple as connecting a specially designated USB drive into my computer and I start “Back In Time”.
Yes, in that order because I don’t I get a rather angry message.
Something else you have to do is either manually or automatically remove old snapshots.
I didn’t pay attention and some of the snapshots completed “WITH ERRORS!” I am sharing this as a cautionary tale to pay closer attention to your backup medium, whatever that may be, to ensure you have enough space.
From there, all I would have to do is click the Save Snapshots Icon.
The application will evaluate the last snapshot against your filesystem and create an incremental snapshot.
The first snapshot is the most time consuming, the subsequent snapshots don’t take nearly as much time.
With Back In Time, there is a feature to adjust how many snapshots it keeps. I ultimately decided to have it automatically delete snapshots older than 6 months (26 Weeks).
For my purposes, anything older than 6 months is likely useless.
I could probably reduce the length of time that I keep.
I really just need the data should something catastrophic happen to all the machines that I keep synchronized.  Your requirements may vary, of course.
I have been told that I should do a separate monthly and weekly offline updates but it is my opinion that for my personal usage, weekly is fine.
I would also say that if you are responsible for an organization or business data, doing the separate monthly and weekly backups, maybe even daily would be better.
I am not a professional here, nor should you take my advice on what is best practice for your organization.
I do recommend that you do backups at some interval and find out what is best for you.
After fumbling my way through Back In Time a bit, adjusting it’s settings for my purposes, this has proven itself to be a fantastic application I can count on to keep my data “safe.” I can personally attest to the ease of backing up and restoring data.
The way I use it isn’t necessarily the best way for you.
Back In Time can do a LOT more than the limited way I am using it.
Even if you don’t use Back In Time, find an application that will help you make backups that is easy to do and sustainable enough to stay consistent.
There isn’t a single downside to it.
Data Back Up | Better to Prevent than to Regret Back In Time on GitHub Back In Time Documentation Back In Time from openSUSE Atlanta Ransomware Attack from SecurityMagazine.com Baltimore Ransomware Attack Article.
, , , Qt         Leave a comment          23 July 201923 July 2019                             SimpleScreenRecorder on openSUSE.
A fine tool for which I recently had some use is this very capable application called SimpleScreenRecorder.
I used it to create a couple simple videos mostly to see how well it works but mostly for the purpose of creating something useful as a reference.
To install it on openSUSE use the one-click method here: https://software.opensuse.org/package/simplescreenrecorder Or, my preferred method, in the terminal, enter: sudo zypper in simplescreenrecorder Fantastically, it is built using the Qt toolkit so it looks much better in the KDE Plasma Desktop Environment.
I have used it for a couple videos and have plans for more, mostly as notes to myself but in video form.
Basic Usage.
After installing the software, it will sit in the multimedia subsection on the menu.
It can be called up in a search as well, at least on Plasma.
Select Continue Next you are presented with your Input Settings.
You can create different profiles for different purposes.
You can also select if you want to record all the screens, a single screen, a fixed rectaning, follow the cursor or to record OpenGL.
I have only used the options to record the entire single screen or a fixed rectangle.
You can choose to record the cursor or not and whether or not you want Audio.
I have only used PulseAudio and it has seemingly worked just fine.
When you Continue, you will have to select the Output Profile or create your own, set the file name, the video and audio codecs settings.
The settings pictured below has worked quite well for me in terms of quality but are a bit excessive in the memory usage.
After all that is set, you can start recording at anytime.
It is also not a bad idea to Start the preview if you want to make sure it looks right before beginning the recording.
The information frame on the left side of the window is quite nice.
It tells you all kinds of useful information about the process.
What is especially good to know is the file size.
Depending on your available system resources, this could become somewhat of a concern.
Once you have completed the recording, hit Stop Recording along the top of the window and Save Recording if you believe you are satisfied with the results.
And that is it.
How I’ve Used It.
I wanted to demonstrate how to set up switching from left-to-right typing to right-to-left typing on LibreOffice    I also did a quick little video just to play with SimpleScreenRecorder and showing how to turn on and off tooltips within KDE Plasma 5.16.
I did edit both of these videos with Kdenlive for practice because someday, someday, I might get good at it.
SimpleScreenRecorder is a fantastic example of easy to use software to create simple videos for any number of things.
This is great for demonstrating how you accomplish something on the desktop, sometimes video is the best way to present it.
This is a fine example of easy to use open source and free software that has an incredible value.
Since I am able to install this application from the official repository with my favorite Linux distribution openSUSE Tumbleweed, it is just another straw on my pile of reasons I use it.
Additionally, it requires no fancy configuration to get going, there is nothing peculiar about running it and it has been seemingly quite reliable.
I have even thought of other fantastic uses besides providing quick little help videos and really, the limits of this application are at the limits of your imagination with this tool.
openSUSE Linux and all it’s fantastic tools add just a bit of happiness to my life, and I am so incredibly grateful to everyone that has had even the smallest part in making this possible.
SimpleScreenRecorder from software.opensuse.org.
SimpleScreenRecorder Home Page.
, , , , Qt, ,          Leave a comment          8 July 2019                             OpenMandriva | Review from an openSUSE User.
My beginnings of using Linux started in 2002 on Mandrake Linux.
I transitioned to full time Linux for my home computer in November of 2003 with Mandrake Linux on a Sony Vaio Laptop.
This was my first serious attempt and getting the Winmodem going was… challenging.
This is where I really learned to start documenting how I did things because nothing seemed as simple and straight forward as they were on the Amiga platform.
This Sony didn’t last long as it did have a hardware failure, twice so I purchased a Dell 5100.
It had the same Winmodem troubles but was quite solvable.
This is my biased review of OpenMandriva as an openSUSE Tumbleweed user using Plasma Desktop that once used Mandriva as a daily driver.
I have a soft spot for Mandriva and consequently OpenMandriva, just on name sake.
To give you the option to bail here, I like OpenMandriva and think it’s a great distribution to use.
At no point did I have a bad experience when installing and using it and would have no problem recommending it to anyone.
Installation.
Good bad or otherwise, OpenMandriva will boot to a live media before you are able to install it.
I can see the benefit of this but this is not my preference.
Regardless, this is your only option.
The installation system is the Calemares Universal Installation Framework to install the operating system to the computer, or in this case, a Virtual Machine (VM).
The installation is straight forward.
You start out by providing your Language and Location details.
I haven’t noted this before but just clicking near where you live will select the correct time zone so the drop down is not really necessary but I don’t think it would be a good idea to remove that feature.
Next, select your keyboard layout.
I can’t help but wonder what it would be like to use a Dvorak keyboard… someday perhaps.
The partition setup on this VM was to use the entire Virtual Disk so I selected Erase Disk.
If I were going too use Manual partitioning, I would have likely set a separate root and home partition.
For the purpose of this level of testing, it was not necessary to set it up for long term use.
You will then be required to enter your user information, select whether or not you want to log in automatically and if you want Root (Administrator user) to have a separate password.
The summary gives a nice brief look at the system changes.
You are given one final sanity check and when you commit, the installer goes through the rolling slideshow about OpenMandriva and upon completion will reboot the system.
Overall, the Installation process is painless.
It should be noted, that I don’t use any proprietary drivers on most of my systems so I have no problems with OpenMandriva.
First Run and Impressions.
The first run of OpenMandriva is a pleasant experience.
It is a great implementation of the KDE Plasma desktop.
The login splash screen presents itself in a kind of springtime freshness to it.
Not that flowers are my preference on my desktop but most certainly around my home, especially in the spring and early summer is very welcoming.
I really appreciate the OpenMandriva Welcome screen.
It gives a great introduction to the project.
It is 100% community driven, .

Uses KDE Plasma by default and what I find interesting is the Automated Build Farm

The OpenMandriva Control center is a nice callback to the days of Mandriva.
This has been at least, on the surface, a visual rewrite of the original control center.
It has a more “welcome mat” feel to it.
Rather than having the purpose hidden away, .

It is presented very clearly what the OpenMandriva Control Center is

The package manager for OpenMandriva was familiar yet a bit different from what I remember during my Mandriva days.
It seemed to function similarly and presented the necessary information for doing what needed to be done.
The update application, dnfdragora-updater, was a bit of a departure from what I was expecting on the desktop.
openSUSE uses the KDE Plasma native Software Updates tool, which is what I was expecting for OpenMandriva.
I really don’t care what tool they use as long as it works.
My issue here was that this just opened up the Software Manager from the Control Center and in order to do the updates, you have to Select all packages and select Apply to begin the updates.
I can see some benefits to tweaking installation applications as they come in but on the other side this is a somewhat tedious addition to the update process.
The jury is out on this one for me.
I see the utility in it, I just don’t think it is what I am used to.
For additional software availability, I selected the OpenMandriva repo-picker and added the 64-bit repositories and later, the 32-bit repositories because, I wanted to see if there were more options of applications to install.
Unfortunately, I was not able to install Discord or Telegram one was not available for installation and the other had some dependencies.
The default multimedia applications are a real nice mix and also highlights what is of project importance to the OpenMandriva community.
Installed by default are Kdenlive, a very fine professional level video editor, Kwave Sound Editor and Simple Screen Recorder.
I can’t recall any other distros that install that by default but my memory can be lacking.
I played around with OpenMandriva for quite some time.
Not all of the tools, time in a day and week makes that somewhat prohibitive but I like a lot of what I saw.
Unfortunately I was not able to install Telegram for the Desktop as there was a missing dependency.
Overall, I like what I see and I could be very comfortable here.
What I Like.
OpenMandriva has a simple installer that is used by many distributions called Calemares.
It works well on many distributions and this is no exception.
A quick setup and off to the OpenMandriva races you go.
The OpenMandriva Welcome Screen and introduction is simply fantastic.
I think all distributions should have something like this as a part of the on-boarding process into the project.
It could be argued that there is almost too much information but in some ways, more is better.
The OpenMandriva Control Center is a fantastic centralized configuration system for the operating system.
Like the Mandriva Control Center before it and not far off from the power of YaST, these Control Center tools are essentially a requirement for me to consider a Linux Distribution.
What I Don’t Like.
The software selection is not as large as many other distributions but with enough effort, I could get what I want.
There is the Automated Build Farm that would allow me to build whatever applications I see as necessary.
The initial layout of the desktop has a large taskbar on the bottom.
Since it is Plasma, it is easily modified. The color theme of OpenMandriva is not a more comfortable dark theme.
This is of course also easily adjusted.
It looks like at some point, OpenMandriva went from URPMI as the package manager to DNF.
I realize that URPMI is in a kind of maintenance mode at this point and isn’t getting any more love.
I would have preferred OpenMandriva had switched to using Zypper instead of DNF as I think Zypper is more mature and DNF doesn’t quite yet have feature parity with YUM.
I must also say that DNF is great, I just happen to think Zypper is greater.

OpenMandriva is a fine Linux distribution with a fantastic history and strong roots

It is a very approachable distribution that feels well polished.
I am will continue to watch this distribution with great interest and hope that they continue to progress and develop the distribution.
The community has done a fine job up to this point.

I am not exactly sure where OpenMandriva sits in the spectrum of Linux Distributions

I don’t know who their target audience is.
I am not sure if they are going after the “new to Linux” users or the more advanced users looking for something else.
I am very happy with openSUSE, the community and the supporting technology.
If all of that were to disappear on me, OpenMandriva looks like a very welcoming and comfortable home for my personal computing life.
I would highly recommend giving OpenMandriva a spin.
Check out the tools see how they work for you.
It has a fine implementation of Plasma and the project very much appears focused.
I truly wish this project great success.
OpenMandriva Home OpenMandriva Automated Build Farm Calamares Project.
, , OpenMandriva, Qt         6 Comments          6 July 2019          6 Minutes                    Coherent Color Scheme Creation for Qt and GTK on openSUSE.
I might be pushing it just a bit by saying I “created” a scheme as I just took two color schemes, Breese Dark and openSUSEdarkalternate, and created one [subjectively] better theme based on those two.
I happen to like the green accents in the openSUSE Workspace Theme and the Breeze Dark Theme looks pretty good but the mix of blue and green accents makes me less happy.
I have been using the openSUSEdarkalternate theme for quite some time until I discovered an issue with one application.
Why take the time?.
A couple reasons.
For starters, the Breeze Dark GTK theme has been using blue highlights, which has been fine.
The tipping point was when I was trying my hand in doing video editing with Kdenlive, I sort of bumped into a problem.
The dark color scheme, openSUSEdarkalternate, did not play well so I had to switch it with the built in Breeze Dark scheme in order to be able to see all the icons and things.
As nice as the stock Breeze Dark theme is, I really want those openSUSE green highlights and now more of my desktop was a mixture of themes.
I was now compelled to unify the appearance of my desktop, especially after noodling around with ElementaryOS and seeing how much emphasis was put on its appearance.
I wanted my choice of desktop to have a more unified but not exactly vanilla Plasma look to it.
I wanted a unified openSUSE Theme.
The Solution.
First was to ensure that all my KDE Plasma applications had a unified look.
My first step was to take screenshots of the different green RGB color-values used in the openSUSEdarkalternate scheme.
The green in that theme is just the hue and vibrance that is subtle and pleasant so it was imperative that I used the same colors.
The absolutely fantastic feature of KDE Plasma as well as the related desktops preceding it is the ability to customize it to your hearts content.
The tools are already there and ready for you to tweak.
A testament to what makes Plasma great.
To start, open the KDE Plasma SystemSettings, then the Colors module under the Appearance section.
The Application Color Scheme tool has several schemes from which to choose.
My first step was to open the openSUSEdarkalternate theme and take note of the RGB values of the different green colors used.
I cheated and used the screenshot utility Spectacle to accomplish this.
There were a total of four different green colors used.
I then opened the Breeze Dark theme and started changed all the relevant blue colors to the equivalent green colors.
I only had to adjust the Common Colors section.
It seems that any of the other sections are using the same Color Identifications.
When I was complete, I saved this scheme as openSUSE Breeze Dark and applied the changes.
It looked good, but then I was still left with the GTK theme to change.
I planned to do similar in Plasma as I did for GTK.
Unfortunately, customizing color schemes in GTK is not baked in like it is Plasma so it was time to do some searching and I came upon this application called Oomox.
There is no official openSUSE package but the fantastic openSUSE community maintains the package and it can be installed from here: https://software.opensuse.org/package/oomox Choose whichever community member maintained package you wish.
Oomox does require one other package in order to run: gdk-pixbuf-devel sudo zypper in gdk-pixbuf-devel I was not able to import the Breeze Dark GTK theme so I just had to create what I wanted manually.
It should be noted that such a feature has been requested.
Good bad or otherwise, GTK color schemes are easier to create from scratch because there are fewer color in a theme.
Not pictured but there is a Roundness theme option so I modified that to match about what the Breeze theme is and set that parameter to 3. I thought that was an interesting setting to have and I quite enjoyed playing with it.
Ommox is a very interesting piece of software and I recommend you to play around with it, just for fun.
It took four iterations of playing with the theme to get it right.
I tested using Gnome-Recipes and Firefox to see that the scheme looked correct to my untrained eye.
My only criticism at this point is the GTK2 Theme is a bit blocky looking.
I am not sure why, exactly.
It just looks somewhat out of place against the Qt and GTK3 widget.
I don’t think it’s a big deal but if anyone has any suggestions on that, I am open to anything you can offer.
Since I am happy with the theme and added to my  page to download.
I will eventually create a package hosted on OBS when I can take the time to do that properly.
Having exact color schemes hasn’t really been a thing for me, so long as it was close enough.
Due to playing around with Elementary OS and seeing how everything is so well thought out, I started looking a bit more closely my desktop and thought, how can I make things look more deliberate.
I am exceptionally pleased with the results and I think I may have also decided to go all in on Breeze Dark + openSUSE green.
I even retired the Oxygen Window Decorations in favor of the Breeze Theme so that it better matches the GTK widgets.
Everything seems nicely coherent.
This is the most satisfied I have ever been with a desktop environment, ever.
Further Reading.
openSUSE Linux | CubicleNate notes https://software.opensuse.org/package/oomox.
, GTK, , , , Qt         Leave a comment          5 February 2019          4 Minutes                    Using Kwin on LXQt with openSUSE.
KDE Plasma is a lot lighter on your system resource than it used to be.
There are options out there that are even lighter.
As of late, I have been acquainted with many light weight distributios, BunsenLabs, MX, antiX, PeppermintOS and more that are even lighter than a basic KDE Plasma.
They are all fantastic distributions and have great implementations of XFCE, LXDE or mixtures of the two and use OpenBox or some other window manger.
The default window manager in LXQt on openSUSE is OpenBox and it is a fine window manager but has a dated appearance to it and the beauty of Linux is to be able to mix and match components to your hearts content.
Why.
I like the features of Kwin, and the window decorations it brings along with some other usability features I have come to expect on my Desktop Environments.
OpenBox is satisfactory and great for what it is but Kwin matches my preferences better.
How.
These instructions are assuming you have installed openSUSE without KDE Plasma as the default desktop.
If you have previously installed KDE Plasma and you are just switching the window manager, jump to the Switch Window Manager section.
Install packages.
In terminal: sudo zypper install kwin5 oxygen5 systemsettings5 Since you are installing a bunch of the KDE Plasma components you are going to pull down all the related dependencies.
The oxygen5 package is completely optional but since that is still my favorite Window Decoration, I have included it.
Feel free to punch in your favorite dressing there or remove that flavor all together.
Switch Window Manager.
After the necessary Plasma components are installed, the next step is to switch out OpenBox with Kwin In the system menu select: Preferences > LXQt Settings > LXQt Configuration Center  Select Session Settings  In the LXQt Session Settings window, Select Basic Settings and under Window Manager, select Kwin_x11.
Select Close, log out and log back in for the changes to take affect.
Customizing.
Upon logging back in, you should immediately notice the system menu looks so much smoother.
Should you decide to further tweak your window settings.
That can be done under Preferences > KDE System Settings.
This will bring up the familiar and fantastic System Settings from the Plasma Desktop Environment.
This will allow you to make further visually pleasing changes to your desktop.
KDE Plasma is by far my favorite desktop environment and it is pretty light weight (relatively speaking) these days under openSUSE.
It will run pretty decent on older or limited hardware.
However, when memory is limited, say, 1 or 2 GiB of RAM, an extra 100 or so MiB of RAM is kind of a big deal.
LXQt is a real nice desktop environment and when compared to some of the other low resource desktops like XFCE, often doesn’t feel as mature, especially when compared to MX Linux or PeppermintOS.
Making this little Window Manager switch makes, in my estimation, improves the user experience.
I run this setup on my netbooks and low end laptops.
Kwin does use an addition 34 MiB of RAM as compared to OpenBox but I am willing to make that trade-off for the improved interface features.
I think a larger smile when using my hardware is worth 34 MiB.
Further Reading.
https://en.opensuse.org/Portal:LXQt Manjaro Wiki on LXQt with Kwin.
, , , Qt         Leave a comment          27 January 2019                             Falkon Web Browser on openSUSE.
A web browser is a tool that is pretty much indispensable for day to day work and annoyingly, over the last few years they have become more and more memory hungry.
My browser habits are as such that I am mostly using the web browser for research, gathering information and expanding my knowledge so very often, w3m is good enough for me most of the time but some sites just don’t read as well.
My solution that has been working out for a few months now is the Falkon Web Browser, formerly known as QupZilla, it is a low memory and resource browser that is peppy and renders pages as expected.
It uses the QtWebEngine which is based on Chromium but with any binary files and any auxiliary services that talk to Google platforms stripped out.
For the most part, I could exclusively use this browser but there are just a few things keeping Firefox open as my secondary browser.
Installation.
Falkon, like anything else, is easy to install from the openSUSE repositories.
I checked this time to be sure and it is available for both Leap and Tumbleweed… sure enough, it is in the official release repositories of both.
For the one-click method of install visit the openSUSE Software Site or alternatively, you can do it the fun and exciting terminal method sudo zypper install falkon If by some chance you don’t run openSUSE, check with your distribution’s software center or download it direct from Falkon here.
They offer Windows binaries and an AppImage.
What It Does Well.
If you read nothing else, read this: The biggest and most important thing this browser does is general web browsing, many, many tabs with almost no appreciable hit to memory.
Even after having multiple tabs open for days, the memory doesn’t creep either.
Somehow, Falkon is managing each tab as such that it doesn’t go all crazy over time.
Sure, if you are running a big, beefy rig with 32 GiB of RAM, this isn’t an issue but running lowered powered hardware, this is an issue.
Falkon is very fast and renders pages without any noticeable artifacts.
Much less an issue with today’s browsers but some time ago, this has been an issue with lesser known browsers.
Also, when using Falkon to post comments or create blathering pages (like this one), it doesn’t bog down over time.
Falkon comes with a built in ad blocker that can be turned off for sites as you wish with a click of the mouse.
I leave the ad blocker on but turn it off for sites I use that depend on advertising dollars.
I would consider this the best ad blocker but it filters out much of the cruft.
Falkon looks great with a KDE Dark Theme.
It fits in well with my desktop theme and has a pleasantly minimal look about it with few buttons and just feels clean.
Visually, this is exactly how I want my desktop and browser to be which is fantastic.
There are some other options in the preferences if you want to make it look less good, if that is what you are most accustomed.
Browser history and bookmark manager are also what you would expect from any modern browser.
I particularly like the interface but it is nothing that Chrome or Firefox are lacking.
What It Doesn’t Do Well.
It doesn’t do Flash but that isn’t such a big deal today.
That means I use Firefox or Chrome to watch Homestarrunner.com videos.
Most of the flash media on the web has seemingly disappeared.
I’m still a fan of Flash… I might be the only one… I can’t watch Netflix with Falkon as it doesn’t have the DRM Extension capability and there isn’t an extension that you can load to add the functionality.
This is another “entertainment” activity, of which I am not generally using Falkon for anyway.

KDE Plasma Browser Integration is not an option but maybe will be in the future

I did some searching and couldn’t find any discussion on it but admittedly, I didn’t search very hard.
This would be a nice function to add and would basically make Falkon almost “feature complete”.
I can’t do one-click install from the openSUSE Software Site and Telegram invite links will also not work in Falkon.
These are actually the largest of issues for me with Falkon.
My work around is just to use Firefox but it would be pretty great if Falkon could do this.
There are a limited number of extensions but truthfully, that is not a big deal for me as I generally don’t run any extensions… unless it’s Chrome but that is another story.
Why I Use It.
I have found on numerous occasions that Chrome and to a lesser extent Firefox will start to memory creep over time.
Using Chrome for a full workday with 6 or 8 tabs open will take up about 6 GiB of RAM and that is only having Gmail, Drive, Calendar and a few Google Documents open.
On my machine with 16 GiB of RAM, this isn’t so much of an issue but on a 4 GiB laptop that I often use as a kind of side kick machine, this is an issue.
This is so bothersome on the 4 GiB machine, I don’t bother with Chrome at all.
It isn’t even usable but Falkon will do all the GSuite activities with a fraction of the memory resources without the memory creep.
I can run that all day and not have a second thought about system resources.
Falkon doesn’t have any of the Google binary blobs doing unknown things.
My primary reason for this is, I want my computer working for me, not working for someone else.
I don’t need my computer cycles and electricity working to service a company unnecessarily and without my consent and I have no proof of this but I am starting to think that all this memory creep that happens in Chrome is largely due to those binary blobs.
Ultimately, I miss the days of using Konqueror as my daily web browser and this feels like a return to those good ol days some 12 years ago.
Clean, simple and basic web browser that I feel like I can trust.
What I Wish It Would Do.
Flash is on it’s way out so I don’t see the development team adding support for that at anytime.

The next thing on my list would be the KDE Plasma Browser Integration

I do listen to some podcasts from some sites and I am able to start and stop the music using my Bluetooth headphones when using Firefox but not so with Falkon.
That lack of functionality is unfortunate.
Another lacking point is having Smart Card Security Device integration.
Just as I can set up Firefox and Chrome / Chromium with the Smart Card system, it would be nice to do so in Falkon.
Falkon isn’t able to open the appropriate software management program when using the One-Click install from the openSUSE Software site nor is it able to access web link invites for Telegram.
If there was some way to shim it with an easy, user-level script, that would be great.
I haven’t yet discovered (though, I haven’t looked) a way to do that but I am hoping it will in time.
Falkon is not what I would consider a “feature incomplete” browser but it is almost exactly as I want it.
Simple and feature reduced.
I don’t want my browser doing very much.
I want its tasks to be limited to basic browsing and not gobble up memory resources.
This is a fantastic productivity browser.
I use it for keeping tabs on different sites and bits of information handy as I go down my rabbit holes.
Having multiple tabs open is also not an issue as Falkon does a good job of memory management and doesn’t start memory creeping when left open.
It is rock solid and has yet to crash on me.
I highly recommend giving Falkon a spin.
See if it will work for you.
You just might be glad you did.
Download Falkon Browser Falkon Browser Project Page on GitHub Plasma Browser Integration W3M Browser More about the QtWebEngine Falkon from openSUSE Repositories Smart Card Security Device Integration Instructions.
, , , , Qt, Web Browser         3 Comments          5 October 2018          6 Minutes                    TeamViewer 13 on openSUSE.
I first started using TeamViewer version 12, last year and it has been a fantastic tool.
I reviewed it very positively as it was a great tool for me to access my systems remotely.
An often spoken criticism of TeamViewer was that it was a Wine application not a true native Linux application.
Unless if you pointed it out or checked your system processes, you would really never know it.
TeamViewer 12 was a fantastic application that ran extremely well on Linux.
What is TeamViewer?.
TeamViewer allows you to remotely access and administer another machine and interact with it as almost as though you had physical access to it.
This remote desktop application works very well even when the connection speed is poor.
This is a commercial, closed-source application that runs on Windows, Mac, Linux, ChromeOS, Android and several others.
It has a free for non-commercial version that I greatly encourage you to try out.
Installation.
I started with getting the SUSE version from the TeamViewer downloads page.
Since I most enjoy using the terminal to do the installation, I navigated to my Downloads folder and performed the install.
sudo zypper in ./teamviewer-suse_13.2.13582.x86_64.rpm Your version number may vary.
A point of note, after the install, I recommend doing a repository refresh: sudo zypper refresh The installation of TeamViewer adds a repository and it will require you to either reject, trust temporarily, or trust always the GPG key for the repository.
If you don’t do this the little update applet in the system tray will display annoying notifications periodically.
Changes Since Version 12.
A much unwarranted criticism of TeamViewer 12 was the usage of a Wine wrapper for the Linux version.
TeamViewer 12 worked smashingly well, incredibly stable and performed well.
With TeamViwer 13, gone is the Wine Wrapper (and hopefully the sneering) as it is now a native Qt application.
It admittedly has a more crisp and smoother appearance to it as compared to the previous version.
The User Interface truly has a new level of polish.
With this change, no features have been lost.
It’s all still there.
Some of the Features.
The tools are broken down into four sections: Actions, View, Communicate and Files & Extras.
The Actions Menu has options, just as you would expect.
Some options are grayed out, presumably that they are premium features, but there is an option under End Session that will End the session and lock.
It is nice to see that the Lock function works as you would expect on KDE Plasma.
The View section has options that seem very self-explanatory.
Something to take note is the option to force an Optimize speed or Optimize quality of the remote session.
If you have multiple monitors on the remote machine, switching between the monitors is easy and intuitive.
Under the Communicate section, there is the ability to chat with the remote user.
Should you be doing tech help for a friend or family member, this can be very handy.
I haven’t had a need to Switch sides with partner before but I can see where that would come in handy.
Files & Extras has the option to do screen recording.
A feature I can see very handy if you have to show someone how to do something and want them to have a record of it to refer back if needed.
The Open file transfer tool is very valuable and super convenient when you have to send off a file as part of the tech help but I have used mostly to send a file to my home computer or the other way around when I am remote.
Use Cases.
My use cases haven’t changed much in the last year, outside of I don’t use it very often with mobile devices.
I have found other ways to directly communicate with them using KDE Connect.
Where I do use it most is to remote into my home system when I am remote.
This is handy when I am working on a project and didn’t want to shut it down and take it with me or to check on a process.
It is great to have the flexibility to remote into my home machine finish a project or continue plugging away at something when there is a some white-space in my day.
The benefits of remote access to help out friends and family that, on the occasion, have tech questions is a fantastic time saver.
What I Like.
The menu items are the same but everything has a better look about it.
The fonts and widgets are smoother and the Toolbar has a pleasant fade to translucent when the mouse moves away from the menu.
TeamViewer continues to be very reliable and the same consistent performance.
If I were to ever make a business in the Information Systems space, this as a fine solution to do remote desktop support.
There are complaints about the expense of it but considering all the features, stability and general polish, the business case is there to use it.
The $49 / month offering for a business that has regular need for it seems justifiable.
I don’t have that much need for it and thankfully, you can use it for free for non-commercial use.
What I Like Less.
The only one, small, regression I have noticed with version 13 is the process of adding new computers to my list.
There wasn’t a right-click option to “add this computer” to my computer list. Adding a remote computer is easy enough doing it the manual way entering the ID and password of the machine.
This is the only a minor annoyance I have noticed.
TeamViewer 13 has a whole new level of polish, has moved away from Wine and is a native Qt application.
I am very impressed by the lack of regressions in making this rather significant transition.
The application does feel a more responsive but that could just be me getting distracted by all the nice new polish.
I didn’t perform any before and after benchmarks to verify.
I continue to be very thankful and grateful that this company builds a version compatible with openSUSE and would allow me to use TeamViewer for non-commercial purposes.
I have become very accustomed to this tool and hope for many more years of usage out of it.
Further Reading.
TeamViewer 12 on openSUSE Leap TeamViewer openSUSE Wine KDE Plasma Desktop KDE Connect Qt Cross-platform software development.
, , , , Qt         1 Comment          6 September 2018          4 Minutes                 Posts navigation.
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